2014, February Sundays

It’s Sunday and the day is off to a slow start. At Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters, the morning crowd is in, their coats and scarves hung over their chairs. An elderly man sits by the window reading a newspaper, sipping a dark espresso. Next to him, two young ladies laugh, warm cappuccinos in their hands and leftover crumbs of chocolate chip cookies in their laps …



It’s Sunday and the day is off to a slow start. At Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters, the morning crowd is in, their coats and scarves hung over their chairs. An elderly man sits by the window reading a newspaper, sipping a dark espresso. Next to him, two young ladies laugh, warm cappuccinos in their hands and leftover crumbs of chocolate chip cookies in their laps. Above the chatter, the buzz of the coffee grinder fills the air and the crowd is enveloped by the rich smell of coffee. The Spirit espresso machine is put to work, accompanied by the high-pitched sizzling of the steaming milk. Behind the dark wooden bar, baristas Onno van Zanten and Florian van Hessel dedicatedly prepare foamy flat whites and short espressos to the likes of Sunday goers.

 

Award-winning barista, Onno van Zanten, has worked in the coffee business for nine years. From sales barista at Douwe Egberts to coffee consultant and owner of a 1952 Mercedes Benz fire truck turned coffee bar, Onno has fuelled his passion for coffee over the years. Why coffee? “I’m always looking for things I can make, think crafts and the finer things,” says Onno. “A cup of coffee, for example, really listens to you. It’s precise – the amount of grams of coffee, the temperature of the water… That has always really appealed to me. I find it fascinating to see how something grows and blossoms. And I’ve always loved the taste and the different flavours you can detect in just one cup of coffee.”

 

Lot Sixty One isn’t the only specialty coffee bar in Amsterdam, but it’s one where they roast their own coffee beans and enlighten coffee enthusiasts about the art of coffee. “When it comes to wine, we know almost everything. We know that a Pinot Noir is a little lighter than say a Merlot, for example. But drinking coffee –even though Douwe Egberts has been around for 250 years– has become such a habit that the average person doesn’t know much about it,” says Onno. “But there has been a change recently. People are starting to ask questions like, what kind of coffee beans do you have? Where do they come from? Becoming more conscious goes hand in hand with wanting quality coffee. That’s where we come in.”

 

Conscious coffee drinking may be a trend as of late, but one thing that isn’t new is the ritual of preparing coffee. Onno explains, “It may be a ritual, but people are educating themselves to see how they can make the most of it. Quality coffee beans and an awareness of different ways to prepare coffee are directly involved in that. And people are looking for a sense of belongingness, looking to share experiences. Coffee plays a large role in togetherness, not just in the coffee bar but also at home, brewing coffee together on a Sunday morning.”

Join our GET TOGETHER on Sunday February 2nd or Sunday February 16th to learn more about the art of coffee with MAKER Onno van Zanten at Lot Sixty One Coffee Roasters.

text by Margot van der Krogt, The Makers Amsterdam
photographed by Jitske Hagens